No Reservations

April 1, 2011 at 11:14 am 5 comments

I live vicariously through Anthony Bourdain’s adventures on “No Reservations.”  I can’t say I want to BE the man, especially not his liver or lungs. Instead, I’d like to be one of his pals who get to share the laughs, late nights, and pure love of food…just once.  (I doubt if he’d ever consider dining with a fuss bucket like me, with all my dietary no-no’s. But a girl can have her fantasy, right?)

Tony does have the life. Wouldn’t it be delicious to swagger around the world with a film crew, communing with the locals who take you to the places to dine on the best regional cuisine, and get paid for it? To relish the beauty, flavors and soul of the food and land, with comrades who dig it as much as you do? To spend hours in fellowship with those who chew, chug, and moan with the same appreciation for every morsel and sip?

Just once, I want no reservations.

To experience the submission that Tony considers one of the true pleasures of dining – whether it’s sucking marrow from a bone in a primitive hut, or dabbing caviar with tiny spoons by candlelight – would make me complete.  I want to totally submit to a dining experience. I want it for all of us who must eat gluten-free. Some say it’ll never happen.  With celiac disease and all the planning and preparation that go with dining out, it’s difficult to put your faith, trust, and stomach in the hands of a chef, kitchen staff, and wait person…completely. With no reservations.

Gluten-free appetizer

The dishes at Appetite for Awareness prove that gluten-free can be safe AND delicious!

For the celiac community, “no reservations” often has the opposite connotation. As in, “No reservation. No table. No food.” Once, after a long day of speaking engagements, I headed to a hotel property near the Detroit airport searching for hot food and a cozy bed.  I hadn’t eaten since breakfast, so I was famished.  After calling the finest “made from scratch” restaurant in the complex, I was told by the manager that they could not accommodate a gluten-free diet.  I thought they must just need an explanation regarding my special diet needs. Nope, they refused to serve me.

Luckily, another chef at a nearby eatery (whose dining room was closed) prepared a simple but lovely piece of fish, potato, and fresh green salad perfectly and safely.  Two restaurants from the same hotel chain with different attitudes and different reactions to a guest’s request.

So why do chefs and restaurateurs have reservations about serving gluten-free options?  Some think it takes too much time, or it’s too difficult. Others don’t know how to prepare food safely, so they opt out. Some think it’s a trend or fad that will go away. We also can’t forget those who think they don’t need special training for gluten-free options. “All you have to do is take out the wheat.” How scary is that?!

And then, there is the one chef (let’s hope only one) who thinks the gluten-free diet is BS, so he serves wheat-laden pasta to those requesting gluten-free pasta. It’s so wrong on so many levels, it’s almost hard to comprehend.

What some chefs don’t get is the knife that just sliced the bread can’t be used to cut the baked potato. What some cooks don’t realize is the ladle used to spread sauce on the traditional pizza crust can’t be used to spread sauce on a gluten-free pizza crust. What some waiters don’t understand is that people who request a gluten-free option most likely would rather not have to bother them for such a need. Our request isn’t a choice; it’s a medical condition.

What the above-mentioned chef doesn’t realize is this: Those with celiac disease who eat gluten in a restaurant probably won’t react to it until later, when they’re stuck in the bathroom all night.  (I’m sure vacations have been ruined by this chef’s intentional glutening.)

I really love my job. As director of NFCA’s Gluten-Free Industry Initiatives, I’m privileged to offer affordable, gluten-free training to those in the foodservice industry and improve quality of life for those with celiac disease at the same time. NFCA’s comprehensive training program is called GREAT (Gluten-Free Resource Education Awareness Training), and we offer it to Kitchens, Schools/Camps, and Dietitians. GREAT restaurants provide safe gluten-free options, train their staff, and make a commitment to follow safe protocols. As a result, they reap the benefits of having loyal customers who bring tables of 4, 6, and 8+ with them time and time again.

National Restaurant Association Show 2010

Teaching chefs what's what at last year's National Restaurant Association Show.

We need your help spreading the word about NFCA’s GREAT program (www.CeliacLearning.com). I know sometimes it’s difficult to speak up and demand safe gluten-free choices, especially because we are grateful for those who put forth an effort to serve us. But providing a GREAT solution helps all gluten-free diners. People are getting sick, their health is at risk, and NFCA wants to end that.

Don’t just fantasize about eating at a famous or local hot spot. Promote GREAT training for a GREAT dining experience, so you can enjoy your food and conversation…with no reservations.

-Beckee

Entry filed under: Beckee. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , .

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5 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Suzy Brazell  |  April 6, 2011 at 4:00 am

    Thank you sooo very much for the wonderful job you do not only making those in the food business aware of our disease but also training them to be celiac SAFE. I like all Celiacs worry everytime I eat out. More and more I am making better choices as to where but even then I get cross contaminated food way too often. I keep hoping that one day our sleepy little town will bring forth a truely safe restraunt or cafe where I could once again enjoy the “No Reservations” style of eating I once knew…without the severe pain and illness caused by gluten. Thank you again and please keep reaching others. We need you!!

    Reply
  • 2. Beckee  |  April 7, 2011 at 11:40 am

    Thanks for your kind words and support, Suzy. Please pass along our GREAT Kitchens information to those restaurants and cafes that you wish were gluten-free friendly. We all need to be more selective and not assume a gluten-free menu means that gluten-free protocol is in place. GREAT Kitchens “get it !

    Reply
  • […] sold gluten-containing bread as “gluten-free,” and the community is still brewing over the server who proudly gave traditional pasta to gluten-free […]

    Reply
  • […] too much detail about how necessary proper training is within the foodservice industry, and the importance of GREAT Kitchens in educating and raising awareness. Most of you already know! My Hotel: The Grove Park […]

    Reply
  • 5. Allison Nastoff  |  August 30, 2012 at 12:13 am

    This was the most wonderful, refreshing post I have read in awhile. One week after my Celiac diagnosis, I had to deal with traveling for a pre-planned family vacation, and I felt like the whole trip I was holding my breath every meal. What if the places people wanted to go didn’t have gluten-free options? What if they theoretically had gluten-free options but weren’t trained in the danger of cross-contamination? Fortunately, only one bar-type restaurant was disrespectful about my needs. The rest were great and I didn’t get sick, but it sure made me long for the old days when I could eat and travel with “no reservations.” It’s refreshing to know I’m not the only one who has felt that way.

    Reply

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